Enterprise Technology Solutions & Managed IT Services

Business ServiceRapid technological advancements, growing competition and increased customer expectations have made a marketer’s job tougher than ever before. An error-free and efficient system is needed to optimize the productivity and growth of these vital industries; therefore Telkom Solution has developed an infrastructure solution to cater all your needs, the Digital Manufacture and Agribusiness Solution.

Since 2003, Cognizant successfully supports companies in making their business processes more productive and efficient. Therefore we rely on the experience of local and international markets and we count some of Switzerland’s best established global players from sectors like financial services, insurance, life sciences and pharmaceutical, manufacturing and retail & consumer goods among our client base. Moreover we have strong working relationships with federal and cantonal authorities as well as productive partnerships with leading universities.

At your service: Convenience-craving consumers are always looking for a way to do things better, faster and cheaper. Often, that means turning to a specialty-services entrepreneur who knows how to get the job done right. Here, we provide some inspiration for aspiring service providers - from adventure-tour leaders to window washers. With 105 ideas to choose from, you have no excuse not to get started today with your own service business.

Faxport is a sports business service and funding platform. Faxport will utilise naturally decentralised and unalterable distributed ledger technology to increase security and mutual trust levels, whilst also reducing abuse and establish a trust system for the global sports industry.

Adam Smith ‘s book The Wealth of Nations, published in Great Britain in 1776, distinguished between the outputs of what he termed “productive” and “unproductive” labor. The former, he stated, produced goods that could be stored after production and subsequently exchanged for money or other items of value. The latter, however useful or necessary, created services that perished at the time of production and therefore did not contribute to wealth. Building on this theme, French economist Jean-Baptiste Say argued that production and consumption were inseparable in services, coining the term “immaterial products” to describe them.